Dr. Abdul Qadeer Khan: Was Pakistan's nuclear scientist the most dangerous man in the world? - My Personal News for Counselling and Recruitment – SAWAAL.Org

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Monday, October 11, 2021

Dr. Abdul Qadeer Khan: Was Pakistan's nuclear scientist the most dangerous man in the world?

 Dr. Abdul Qadeer Khan: Was Pakistan's nuclear scientist the most dangerous man in the world?
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On December 11, 2003, a group of officers from the CIA and the British intelligence agency MI6 were about to board a special plane in Libya when they were handed a bundle of khaki envelopes.

The team was nearing the end of a secret mission of crucial talks with Libyan officials. When he boarded the plane and opened the khaki envelopes, he realized that he had been given the important evidence he desperately needed. These khaki envelopes contained nuclear weapon designs.
Dr. Abdul Qadeer Khan
Dr. Abdul Qadeer Khan




In addition to these designs, parts related to the nuclear program were provided by Dr. Abdul Qadeer Khan, a Pakistani nuclear scientist. Dr Qadeer died on Sunday at the age of 85.

Abdul Qadeer Khan has been a key figure in global security for the past half century. His character was one of the main characters in the ongoing battle over the world's most dangerous technology, where those who have the technology and those who want to get it face to face are face to face.

Former CIA Director George Tent called AQ Khan "at least as dangerous as Osama bin Laden." He made the comparison after realizing that Osama bin Laden was the mastermind of the 9/11 attacks.
On December 11, 2003, a group of officers from the CIA and the British intelligence agency MI6 were about to board a special plane in Libya when they were handed a bundle of khaki envelopes.

Dr. Abdul Qadeer Khan
Dr. Abdul Qadeer Khan
The team was nearing the end of a secret mission of crucial talks with Libyan officials. When he boarded the plane and opened the khaki envelopes, he realized that he had been given the important evidence he desperately needed. These khaki envelopes contained nuclear weapon designs.

In addition to these designs, parts related to the nuclear program were provided by Dr. Abdul Qadeer Khan, a Pakistani nuclear scientist. Dr Qadeer died on Sunday at the age of 85.

Abdul Qadeer Khan has been a key figure in global security for the past half century. His character was one of the main characters in the ongoing battle over the world's most dangerous technology, where those who have the technology and those who want to get it face to face are face to face.

Former CIA Director George Tent called AQ Khan "at least as dangerous as Osama bin Laden." He made the comparison after realizing that Osama bin Laden was the mastermind of the 9/11 attacks.
Dr. Khan was involved in the manufacture of centrifuges for uranium enrichment at a European company.

Enriched uranium can be used for nuclear energy and, if over-enriched, can be used to make an atomic bomb.

Dr. Abdul Qadeer Khan succeeded in copying the designs of modern centrifuges of the time and returned to his country where he formed a secret network consisting of most of the European businessmen who were instrumental in making atomic bombs and centrifuges. They used to supply most of the ingredients (raw materials).

Dr. Abdul Qadeer Khan is often called the 'founder' of Pakistan's nuclear program, but in fact he was one of the most important members of the program.

But he carefully crafted his own story, which earned him the status of a national hero who developed the atomic bomb to protect Pakistan against the Indian threat.

What else did Dr. Abdul Qadir do that made him so important? He turned his secret network of suppliers of nuclear weapons components from import to export, and he became a world-renowned figure, making deals and deals with many countries. Many of these countries were considered "rebel states" by the West.

The development of centrifuges for the nuclear program in the Iranian city of Natanz, which has been a major cause of intense international diplomacy in recent years, was largely made up of designs and materials provided by Abdul Qadir.

In a meeting, Abdul Qadir Khan's representatives provided Iran with a list of materials and components used in the preparation of a nuclear program, which included prices, and the Iranian authorities could order goods accordingly.

Abdul Qadeer Khan also made more than a dozen trips to North Korea, where it is believed that missile technology was replaced by missile technology.
With all these deals, an important secret has always been whether Abdul Qadeer Khan was doing all this alone or was he acting on the orders of his government, especially in the case of the agreement with North Korea.

It was once said that Abdul Qadeer Khan was doing all this in the lure of money but it is not so simple. He wanted to work with his country's leadership as well as break the Western monopoly on nuclear weapons.

He criticized Western monopolies on nuclear weapons technology, calling it "Western hypocrisy" and asking why some countries should be allowed to possess such weapons for their own protection and defense, while others should not. why not.

He once said, "I am not a madman or a fool." They dislike me and they make all sorts of fabricated and baseless allegations against me because I have thwarted their strategic plans.

The other people in his network that I met when I was writing a book about Abdul Qadeer Khan, I felt like they were doing it out of greed for money. The deal with Libya over its nuclear program in the 1990s not only gave it more money but also accelerated its decline.
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